22 Jobs Every Creative Solopreneur Must Be Able to Do


by Dana Detrick-Clark

22 Jobs Every Creative Solopreneur Must Be Able to Do

They say solopreneurs must wear many hats, but exactly how many?

Here’s a list of the 22 roles all creative solopreneurs have to fill to keep their businesses afloat.

RUNNING THE CREATIVE SHOW

1. Creative Director and/or Project Manager

No matter what area of creative is your focus, “CD” is your title. From developing concepts and products for both clients and in-house marketing, to overseeing and organizing outsourced creative, acquiring projects and leads, creating timelines, plus checks and balances for all, it is all on your shoulders.

2. Talent Agent

Any creative will be managing, acquiring, and selling talent – even if it’s just their own!

3. Web Developer

Most of us at least start out taking on some of these duties on our own. Having direct control of your web branding, site maintenance, e-commerce, and the user experience is not to be underestimated.

4. Graphic Designer

Ok, so you might already be a graphic designer by trade, but even if you’re not, odds are good you’ll be creating some visual collateral at some point (even if it’s just an avatar or simple logo).

5. Audio Producer

Whether you’re putting together your own podcasts or your specialization is in audio production, this is a consideration now. Digging into development tasks that include editing, mastering, software, and session management is the least of what you can expect to do.

6. Video Producer

If you’ve got a smartphone, you’re creating something for your business with it. Even something as small as a branded Vine or Periscope video is part of almost every marketing plan, but many are doing much more. Content creation, acquisition of b-roll or templates, hardware, and software are on your to-do list.

7. Photographer

You are going to be hard pressed to not find some aspect of your work that won’t require photography at some point. Even if you’re just maintaining a presence on Instagram or Facebook, photos are basic components to engage your audience.

8. Copywriter and/or Blogger

The written word is your most powerful marketing tool, used at almost every stage in business life. From proposals to web copy to podcast scripts and invoices, you’ll be speaking (effectively, if you take this seriously) through every marketing channel.

SALES AND MARKETING

9. Advertising Agent and/or Marketing Manager

Such a small word for such big tasks. Overseeing all marketing efforts including branding, plans, structures, communications, collateral, branding, and vendors, for inbound and traditional advertising campaigns.

10. Social Networking Strategist and Manager

Digital Marketing tactics to get the word out about your business often fall to the solopreneur first. Controlling, developing and managing networks, online marketing plans, and contacts are all going to be part of your daily life.

11. Public Relations Specialist (PR)

Traditional public relations will be your job, too. You’ll need to develop media relationships, manage collateral and delivery channels, communications, and create press releases.

12. Salesperson

Lead generation, qualification, and conversion can be creative, too. Prospecting, networking, cold calling, and discovery sessions are part of the deal, whether it’s product, licensing, or service sales you’re after.

13. Consultant

Every creative has to be able to get to the heart of their clients’ needs, walk them through the process, and defend their decision making. A good grasp of consulting is the way it’s best done.

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THE COGS

14. Content Manager

Developing systems of organization, registration, and distribution for your traditional and digital content will keep the cogs rolling. Without properly having processes in place here, chaos can overtake a solopreneur’s business quickly.

15. Legal

You’re in charge of developing licenses, forms, rules, and policies, as well as your communications with an outside legal consultant (wouldn’t recommend completely doing this one on your own!).

16. Accountant

Payables and receivables, taxes, growth tracking, billing, communications, and filing systems fall into this category, but like legal, it’s recommended to at least have an accountant on stand-by for the big things.

17. Distribution

If you deal in physical deliverables at all, you’ll need to create some processes to make this as quick and painless as possible. Whether it’s a shipping and receiving routine, or acquiring channels for digital delivery, you are in charge of making sure the buyer gets their goods.

18. Customer Service

The relationship does not end when the check clears, so proactively create systems for this before you need it.

19. Clerical Worker

General filing and office management may not seem like that big of a deal – until you go without it.

20. Finance and Funding Expert

The acquisition of investors and opportunities will call for some technical writing skills, good accounting sense, and specific legal knowledge, all geared for forward motion.

21. IT Tech

Gotta keep the systems running! That includes all of the hardware and software in your office.

THE WORK

22. YOU!

This is the reason you started your business. It may feel like, with all of the responsibilities on your shoulders above, your true purpose got a little lost. But when you’re in “The Zone” using your talent to solve your client’s most urgent problem, all of these other tasks will be worth it.

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Dana Detrick-Clark has made it her mission to help creatives and small businesses like you broaden their reach in less time and with less effort. How does she do that? By providing premium content, creative consulting, and marketing confidence. Contact her today at http://www.seriousvanity.com.

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Comments & Responses

4 Responses so far.

  1. This is a wonderful run-down of many of the qualities needed to be a successful solo-preneur in the VO world. I will keep this on file to share with everyone who contacts me about what is necessary to run a successful business. Most have no idea what they’re getting into, and often lack the appropriate skills to get past just having fun reading copy. Thanks Dana!

    • Thank you for that, Debbie! I mapped this out years ago for myself so no stone was left unturned. I think it helps to see, too, where you could be hiring and outsourcing things once you grow big enough. Just having the vision sets the ball rolling!

  2. This is a great, comprehensive list of what is needed for a voice actor (or any solopreneur) to be successful as a business person. Many of our VoiceActing Academy students come in thinking voiceover is all about performing and are surprised to discover all the additional skills needed to actually work in this business. I devote roughly half of my book, “The Art of Voice Acting,” to the business side of VO. Your list brings everything together and would be a perfect addition to the next edition. Thanks for putting this together.

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